Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Circadian Rhythm Gene May Serve as Target for Glioblastoma Therapies

Scientists from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute say a gene involved in the body's circadian rhythms is a potential target for therapies for glioblastoma.
Their discovery (“Casein Kinase 1 Epsilon Regulates Glioblastoma Cell Survival”), published in Scientific Reports, points to a subtype of a particular gene that apparently is enabling the survival of cancer cells, although it is more commonly associated with circadian rhythms.
“In our previous work, we identified casein kinase 1 ε (CK1ε, also known as CSNK1E) as a potential survival factor in glioblastoma. However, how CK1ε controls cell survival remains elusive and whether targeting CK1ε is a possible treatment for glioblastoma requires further investigation. Here we report that CK1ε was expressed at the highest level among six CK1 isoforms in glioblastoma and enriched in high-grade glioma, but not glia cells. Depletion of CK1ε remarkably inhibited the growth of glioblastoma cells and suppressed self-renewal of glioblastoma stem cells, while having limited effect on astrocytes,” write the investigators.

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