Monday, April 14, 2008

Monday at the AAN Meeting

I'm now awaiting the commencement of the colloquium on neurology education, which I thought might be of use since I teach neurology and neuropathology to medical students and all neurology residents at SIU rotate with me at some point. Last night I had a pleasant dinner with Dr. J. Clay Goodman, where I encouraged him to publish a second edition, with Dr. Greg Fuller, of the best introductory neuropathology guide on the market: Practical Review of Neuropathology (2001). I mentioned that all he needs is a little updating and a switch to color pictures, and he has a best-seller. He replied that he and Greg have talked about putting out a new edition, perhaps a web-based version that will avoid a publisher altogether. Also at dinner with Goodman was Dr. P. James B. Dyck of the Mayo Clinic. The occasion was a dinner seminar that Goodman and Dyck were presenting entitled "You Want to Biopsy My What?".  This outstanding presentation focused on brain biopsy for rapidly progressive CNS disease (Goodman) and peripheral nerve (Dyck). Goodman closed his presentation with the following line: "When you hear hoofbeats, think horses rather than zebras... unless you're in the Serengeti. And in neurology, you always have one foot in the Serengeti!"

Dr. Robert Darroff, of Case Western, is currently giving an amusing talk entitled "Advice to Educators". He says that students are more receptive to learning when they are feeling relaxed. Humor is not to be underestimated in teaching!

7 comments:

JD said...

You teach neurology? With all due respect, I don't think you're a neurologist!

Adam King said...

From a student standpoint, humor helps keep us focused on the lecture and interested in the material.

Brian E. Moore, MD (left) said...

To JD:
I indirectly teach neurology insofar as I talk about clinical presentations of neurologic diseases which have histopathologic substrates. But, I certainly never represent myself as a neurologist. I'm not smart enough to be a neurologist!!!

Anonymous said...

To JD and Dr. Moore:

Who cares if Dr. Moore is a Neurologist? Most of the Neurology professors that I know, cant teach a toddler to soil himself. I know plenty of neurologist including those mentioned above. Most only want residents to do their scut (Clay Goodman is one rare exception). Oh, neurologist are no smarter than the next guy. My IQ is about 120 so I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed, but I consider myself a good Neurologist.

Brian E. Moore, MD said...

Dear Anonymous,
Thanks for your input. To clarify, I am not a neurologist, but rather a pathologist with subspecialty training in neuropathology. I think you're right: neurologists as a group are no more intelligent than any other kind of doctor.
- Brian

Anonymous said...

Now I am on an unstoppable tangent. Why isnt neuropathology required in Neurology residency? ..... because it interferes with cheap labor. Neurology residents make more money for the system if they are processing sdmissions etc.... It cost money to teach things like Neuropathology. For a resident to learn Neuropathology he/she usually must give up another very important elective. EVERY Neurology resident should be required to take a MINIMUM of one month of Neuropathology. I consider Fuller and Goodman a MUST READ for any serious Neurologist (but dont tell the authors I said that).

Brian E. Moore, MD said...

Actually, at my institution, the neurology residents are required to take a month rotation in neuropathology their first year and a two-week neuropathology rotation in their second year.