Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Finally, a simple cartoon depicting the anatomic location of the transentorhinal cortex


In our teaching and in our autopsy reports, we neuropathologists often make reference to the transentorhinal cortex as it is -- in the Braak and Braak staging system -- the region where the earliest Alzheimer pathology appears. I have found it difficult to find a clear illustration of the anatomic location of the transentorhinal cortex in texts or on the internet. However, I came across a nice cartoon of the divisions of the parahippocampal gyrus, including the transentorhinal cortex, in an online presentation by Prof. Jillian Kril of the Pathology Department at the University of Sydney, NSW. Prof. Kril kindly emailed me a copy of the illustration, which is depicted above with the addition of a label for the presubiculum.  Feel free to use this cartoon for teaching purposes with the following credit: Adapted from Harding AJ, Halliday GM, Kril JJ. Variation in hippocampal neuron number with age and brain volume. Cerebral Cortex (December, 1998) 8:710-718.

5 comments:

Adam King said...

The 1st year students need to see this when they are doing anatomy for neuro. You could probably send it to Dr. Shea or Dr. Clough.

jd said...

So the dark area is presubiculum. Interesting. Will have to look it up.

shipcolldoc said...

The diagram doesn't show the prosubiculum, which is at the other end of the subiculum as I recall (have not looked this up lately). Also, this is a coronal view, and one should also realize that, like the hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex has a considerable fronto-occipital length, from as far forward as the amydgala.

Brian E. Moore, MD said...

To Shipcolldoc:
By "the other end of the subiculum", do you mean between CA1 and the subiculum?

Thanks for the point about he fronto-occipito length. These two-dimensional representations do have their limitations!

- Bran

bathmate said...

it really very good.
I love it !


Bathmate