Tuesday, February 17, 2015

The Perils of Crossing Boundaries in the Interstate Practice of Neuropathology: Real of Imagined?

A provocative article entitled Crossing Boundaries: A Comprehensive Survey of Medical Licensing Laws and Guidelines Regulating the Interstate Practice of Pathology appeared in March of last year in the American Journal of Surgical Pathology (Am J Surg Pathol 2014;38:e1–e5) which addressed recent judicial interpretations of interstate medical licensure laws. These legal developments are relevant to neuropathologists insofar as we, as a small group of sub-specialists, not uncommonly serve as consultants on surgical cases from outside of our own state. Recent legal judgements have found pathologists guilty of malpractice and even the criminal practice of medicine without a license. Given these recent developments, authors MC Hiemenz, ST Leung, and JY Park surveyed the licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. The authors then grouped states according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. The survey determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of geographic location of the patient at the time of the surgery.  Thirty-two states and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with an in-state license. However, five states prohibit physicians from consulting out of state unless they themselves hold a license in that state. Other states have limited restrictions, such as requiring that the consultation itself occur within the state.  The authors conclude that pathogists who either send cases out to consultants in other states or who serve as consultants to out-of-state pathologists should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they either send or receive cases. In a November 2014 letter to the editor, Edward O Cousineau, JD, deputy executive director of the Nevada State Board of Medical Examiners, wrote that "the representations in the article, related to how Nevada law applies to out-of-state licensed specialists, are erroneous". In the article, Nevada was represented as being in the category which allows for an out-of-state licensed physician to practice medicine in consultation with an in-state licensed physician, with the additional stipulation that the consultation must occur within the state boundaries. Mr. Cousineau, in representing the Nevada Board, stated that Nevada allows out-of-state consultations without the stipulation that the consultation must occur within state boundaries. Given Nevada's response to the survey, it may be that more states allow out-of-state consultation than the article indicates. Unfortunately, however, the article have resulted in the unnecessary restriction of certain out-of-state consultations by cautious department chairs

Please comment if you have been impacted by these state licensure issues when either consulting out of state or seeking a consultation from an out-of-state neuropathologist. I'm sure your colleagues would be interested in hearing your story.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Best Post of October 2014: Release of new edition of Greenfield's expected this month

The next in our "Best of the month" series is from October 2, 2014.  Since the original post, there's been an update on the price from Amazon: you save 9% if you pre-order the book. I had it listed in October at $778.35. Now, Amazon is listing it at $635.43. Here's the original post:


My secret agent intercepted this communication

Editors: Seth Love, Arie Perry, James Ironside, Herbert Budka
Title: Greenfield's Neuropathology 9e
ISBN: 9781444166934
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Estimated pub date: 20 February 2015
Estimated extent: 2000pp
Print run: 2000 copies
Listed on Amazon for only $778.35!!!!!!